Illuminate and Eliminate Invisible Performance Barriers

Leaders spend a great deal of time creating strategies, laying out short– and long-term  plans to increase market share, improve net income, or simply retain customers only to have those best-laid plans run into unseen barriers. The types of barriers range from unforeseen expenses to a lack of motivation from employees.

To uncover these hindrances to performance and deal with them effectively takes an ability to analyze factors within the organizational system. This is no easy task in the rapid-fire corporate environment most of us live in.  The barriers remain hidden to us because we can’t slow down enough to reflect and consider what is getting in the way of the plans we were sure would work.

Exposing performance gaps requires a systematic approach that looks beyond the surface assumptions, such as training, pay and incentives. It is a common solution to retrain or reprimand employees who are not meeting performance expectations, but we fail to get to the real issue, which could be anything from an ineffective software program, a poor system of accountability, or a workflow that creates a bottleneck outside the control of the employee you’ve determined is a poor performer.

The fact is, identifying gaps in human performance is not simple. It takes skill and a reliable process to evaluate the multiple factors that contribute to performance gaps.  A useful model is the Human Performance Technology model promoted by the International Society for Performance Improvement, which espouses ten competencies that, properly applied, identify the unseen barriers and provide a framework for performance improvement.

 Illuminating and eliminating invisible performance barriers takes practice, but the benefits of following the HPI model leads to net gains, increased engagement/satisfaction, and an increasing ability to see the unseen as the organization builds a culture of evaluating the system and making smart, strategic decisions.

*To find out more about Human Performance Improvement & Technology, visit www.ispi.org

Visit www.cornerstoneglobaltps.com for more information about HPT-based consulting.

Employees key to bouncing back after the recession

Few companies have come through the past 2-3 years unscathed by the recession. Leaders should consider the impact the recession has had on those who have survived in your organization. How are your employees doing at riding the wave of the economic crisis?

  • Are they disheartened, barely hanging on?
  • Are they committed to your organization and doing everything they can to maximize revenue?
  • Are they coming to you with innovative solutions to bring new customers?
  • Are they maintaining your reputation or just waiting for an opportunity to jump ship?
  • Have you been so focused on surviving the recession to pay much attention to the needs of your employees?

Most companies cut training and development when times get hard.  At the same time incentives and motivational processes take a hit, leading to a discouraging scenario for employees.  If layoffs or deferred hiring also are used to cut expenses during a downturn, the surviving employees are asked to do more with less. The accumulative effect is a disengaged workforce that puts in minimal effort, feeling that the organization doesn’t do anything to earn their commitment.

Not all of this is fair, of course, since employers have to do something to ride out the storm. It’s important for business leaders to understand the value of learning during challenging economic times. The old adage, “You have to spend money to make money” comes into play here.  According to a 2009 study by The American Society for Training and Development (ASTD) and i4cp (Organizational Learning in Tough Economic Times), 38% of companies plan to place more emphasis on learning during the economic crisis. The remaining 60% are either maintaining pre-recession levels or cutting back, some drastically.

The reality is that there’s never been a better time to focus on talent development within your organization.  It is your employees that will pull your company through and help your regain traction as the economy begins to recover.  Managers and business owners must become astute at managing performance, growing talent, and leveraging strengths to maximize human capital.

Because people are the cornerstone to any business – the foundation upon which the organization either stands strong or falters, the wisest thing for companies to do is become experts in managing human performance.  A strong human capital strategy includes an assessment of desired verses actual performance, analysis of strengths & competencies and selection practices to ensure the right people are in the right job, and a commitment to developing people that doesn’t waver despite market and economic fluctuations.

The good news is that human performance management doesn’t have to be expensive! And the return on investment pays off quickly. The key is having a plan and sticking with it. Once processes are in place they can be maintained through feast or famine.  Keep in mind the toll that the economic crisis has on your employees and consider budget-conscious solutions that will keep them engaged. Your employees want to succeed, but need to know they can trust management to support them.

As businesses make difficult decisions about how to pull through the current economic downturn, they must think beyond the knee-jerk reaction to slash costs to the bone. In ASTD’s Economic Survival Guide, the message is “Survival of the learning function in a down economy is all about leveraging existing best practices, eliminating redundancies, and creating programs or situations where employees can learn from each other.” You may want to invest in the services of an organization development consultant to initiate your human performance analysis, which will ensure you’re focusing on the most valuable efforts that lead to sustainable performance and position your company for success as the economy bounces back.

A good story

Do you have a friend or family member who is great at telling stories or recounting events? My wife, Jenifer, is an amazing storyteller. It’s one of the things that attracted me to her in the first place. She can take the most mundane encounter and make it into a dramatic tale with an unexpected plot twist and even a moral to the story. I’m envious of her and others who can engage people in what they have to say. They make everyday life interesting and see things that others don’t see.

Stories are powerful and leaders are becoming increasingly aware of how they can shape a company culture. As the workplace becomes more complex we need stories to ground us and connect us to one another. Global organizations span multiple cultures, yet need to have a central theme that bonds them across geographical boundaries.

Zappos has done a great job in leveraging social media to tell their story. Type in “zappos” at YouTube and you’ll get over 5,000 hits! Some of the videos are posted by Zappos leaders and employees, but others are submitted by loyal customers. Same thing goes for TOMS shoes – there are more than 2,000 videos that tell the story about how TOMS shoes was founded, how they give away a pair of shoes for every pair sold, and how they’re changing the way we look at corporate social responsibility.

I’m still practicing my storytelling skills and have made this an intentional focus because I believe the way we tell stories to one another shapes our views and attitudes. I enjoyed listening to Jeanne Baer at ASTD-Lincoln yesterday. She shared 7 reasons why stories work as a tool and 8 different types of stories we can use, depending on our goals and situation. I’m looking forward to hearing Rita Paskowitz share her approach to storytelling at the Omaha Organization Development Network meeting next Wednesday.

Welcome to Minding the Gap

The Minding the Gap blog is a forum to communicate and collaborate on what it takes to get from here to there. It’s a journey infused with leadership and change and progress – a winding path to improve as individuals and organizations. I encourage you to join the conversation, add your perspective, and help create the mileposts of learning and growth.