Turn Resolutions into Meaningful Goals

Peak Performance

Cornerstone Global Training & Performance Solutions: Peak Performance Digest

 

 

 

Men (and women) should pledge themselves to nothing;
for reflection makes a liar of their resolution. -Sophocles

 

Sophocles appears to have had a dim view of resolutions. Your own performance may attest to his observation…the commitment to join the gym in January that lasts until February, followed by months of guilt. Our good intentions give way to old habits more quickly than it took to eat that “just one more” Christmas treat!

A new year seems to be a perfect time for a fresh start. As we pin up a new calendar on the wall with no history of missed opportunity, 365 empty boxes that represent all that is possible, we optimistically say, “this year is going to be different.”

Resolving to improve ourselves and our circumstances is hardwired in to the human experience. But often the behaviors and beliefs that keep us back are deep-rooted and unconscious. That includes how we lead ourselves and others as well as how we manage our work.

So what do we do when we want to improve but are reluctant to make resolutions? Follow these three steps to create meaningful goals that have a higher chance of success than a simple “resolution.”

  1. Narrow your focus. When goals are fuzzy, or we have too many of them, they quickly become overwhelming. Make a list of what you want to improve or accomplish and prioritize it . Chose 1-2 to start with, and wait until you have momentum and some success before adding another goal.
  2. Gather information. Take some time to research and reflect. Chances are you have some knowledge of your areas of improvement or accomplishment, but could probably benefit from some expert knowledge.
  3. Do something! Waiting for perfect conditions tends to stall us before we even get started. Break your goals into manageable chunks and milestones and give yourself credit for small wins. Don’t get discouraged when you backslide on your mission – acknowledge it, retool, and get back at it!

Right Management: Only Half of Firms Regard Talent Management as Top Priority



Right Management Survey Reveals Only Half of Major Firms Regard Talent Management as a Top Priority (via PR Newswire)

PHILADELPHIA, Dec. 4, 2012 /PRNewswire/ — Only half of major organizations regard talent management as a top priority, according to a survey of 537 U.S. companies by Right Management, the talent and career management expert within ManpowerGroup. For 13% of organizations talent management is a secondary…

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Twenty Minutes a Day

My last blog post was months ago. I have started to write a couple of times, but could never finish and publish. I was buried beneath my to-do list, and couldn’t seem to get caught up.

Then a client asked me to deliver training to help their executive team figure out how to accomplish the organization’s strategic goals when everyone seemed to be struggling to keep up with the daily grind.

As I began to put the lesson together, I realized I had to figure this issue out for myself!

I just graded papers for my Managing Organizational Change class, where more than half the students wrote about procrastination and time management for a project on personal change. I empathize with their struggle to find balance and set priorities so that assignments get done on time. Students often think their situation is unique, trying to have a social life, make money, and stay on top of their school work.

Instead of offering a reprieve, adulthood only complicates things. Juggling family, work, volunteer work, and hopefully some diversions from the monotony of daily routine keep us from making time for all of our good intentions, our strategic goals, those “some day” projects we never seem to get to.

My to-do list is not likely to shrink much in the near future, although I’m working that angle to see where I can cut out meetings, networking that does not add value, and commitments that I should probably back out of or defer. I am becoming much more diligent in reviewing my calendar to eliminate things that keep me from what is essential or most important.

A regular calendar audit is useful to make sure you don’t allow things to creep onto your schedule without a good reason.

But what I have discovered recently is that I can make progress on my strategic goals, be they personal or professional, with a commitment of only 20 minutes a day. That’s about how long it takes to write a short blog message, read (or write) part of a chapter in a book, research a new topic, or set up a tracking system.

For those things that will take longer, I’m learning to break the tasks down into twenty-minute increments and scheduling the time when I’m at my peak focus and energy, and least likely to get distracted by my to-do list.

Even if I don’t get as far as I want as fast as I want, I will still be able to see progress. Those strategic dreams will begin to take shape. Little by little I will see things take shape and can celebrate the small victories as long-term goals are no longer pipe dreams.

Twenty minutes a day, every day, seems pretty doable!