Five Reasons You Need to Hire a Coach

Connor is a former business student of mine who just got his second promotion since joining a national retail firm three years ago. He’s managing a group of professionals and reached out to me to provide coaching as he takes on his new responsibilities. He has a boss, of course, who can provide direction and help him through the learning curve, but Connor wanted someone who could not only help him navigate the role, but provide unbiased input as well as a sounding board from a source that wasn’t writing his performance review.

Connor and I talk through relationships with his team, especially those he finds more challenging to manage. We’ve worked through the company’s new performance management system and how it can be used positively despite the fact that it’s not perfect. I’ve shared some tools with him that will help him build relationships while helping his team reach their goals, and Connor has asked me questions about managing his own career and influencing his bosses.

Executive coaching has seen strong growth in the past decade. Coaching credentials are varied, although the International Coaching Federation (ICF) is probably the most well known and respected certifying bodies. They offer a solid program that ensures coaches have good model to follow. But there are many excellent coaches whose credentials are based on experience more than certification.

Why You Need a Coach

We all understand the role of a coach in athletics – they’re the ones on the sidelines during the game giving direction, correcting missteps, and providing encouragement. But before game day the coach spends hours teaching game strategy, instilling discipline, and focusing on conditional and strength development. The coach doesn’t play in the game, but they know the game inside and out and provide invaluable input that leads to improvement and, ideally, a win.

The executive coach has a similar role. They assess, teach, provide feedback, instill habits, and act as a cheerleader on the sidelines. But in the world of business or nonprofit management, is a coach really necessary? After all, I went to college, have years of experience, and have done pretty well on my own. That may be true, but sometimes we don’t see roadblocks that are keeping us back, or opportunities that are right before us.

A coach can help us see those things, plus help us create a strategy and associated processes to achieve our goals. If you’re interested in getting to the next level in your career, a professional coach can help you.

The Five Reasons You Need a Coach

A professional executive coach can provide five things that you might not be able to do for yourself.

  1. Assessment. A skilled coach has a bag of tricks they use to assess your strengths, aptitudes, default mindsets, etc. This is the starting point for most coaching relationships.
  2. Expertise. Although your coach may not be an expert in your industry, they are experts at insight and drawing parallels from experience in multiple industries. They can shed light on things from a unique perspective that challenges you to see the world differently.
  3. Accountability. One of the greatest benefits of a coach is the accountability they provide. Their objectivity allows them to challenge you without emotional baggage that comes from a friend or boss.
  4. Processes and Tools. A coach teaches a coachee valuable models and processes that build positive habits.
  5. Achievement. Strategy creation provides measurable achievement for you, and a good coach will provide insights and means to move you toward achieving meaningful, intentional success.

Some specific outcomes of coaching are:

  • In one study conducted by MetrixGlobal LLC, companies including Booz Allen Hamilton received an average return of $7.90 for every $1 invested in executive coaching.
  • A recent study of Executive Coaching in a Fortune 500 firm by MetrixGlobal reported a 529% return on investment and significant intangible benefits to the business.
  • A survey by Manchester Inc. of 100 executives found that coaching provided an average return on investment of almost six times the cost of the coaching.
  • An internal report of the Personnel Management Association showed that when training is combined with coaching, individuals increase their productivity by an average of 86% compared to 22% with training alone.
  • A Hay Group study of Fortune 500 companies found that 21 to 40% utilize Executive Coaching; Coaching was used as standard leadership development for elite executives and talented up-and-comers.
  • A 2001 study on the impact of executive coaching by Manchester Inc. showed an average ROI of 5.7 times the initial investment or a return of more than $100,000, according to executives who estimated the monetary value of the results achieved through coaching.

(Retrieved from ActionCOACH.com)

What To Look for in a Coach

Coaching is about creating the future, so finding a coach who will equip and enable you to do so is critical. So how do you know if you’re getting a good coach? And by good I mean someone with whom you have rapport, a person you feel comfortable with, and someone who can move you toward achieving your life and career goals?

Erika Anderson, writing for Forbes.com, identified some important elements in coach selection. Before committing to a coaching relationship, conduct an interview and really make sure you get answers that make sense to you. Paraphrasing Anderson, a good coach will:

  • Provide clarity about the process. They’ll provide a roadmap of the process they’ll use.
  • Facts and feedback. A good coach will try to get the perspective of those with whom you work most closely, rather than relying on your view.
  • A learning approach. Skilled coaches go beyond dialogue and move toward ability and action.
  • If your prospective coach is talking openly about other clients, they’ll do the same with you.
  • Measurable outcomes. Your coach should be able to provide you with solid examples of helping coachees achieve their goals.

Coaching certification may be less important than other credentials, depending on what you’re looking for. The important thing is that you have confidence in the coach’s ability to take you through a process that will get you closer to your dreams.

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About the author: Todd Conkright, MA, CPT is a Certified Performance Technologist who combines expertise in human performance, six sigma process improvement, and the soul of a teacher to help clients achieve their personal and organizational dreams. If you’d like to talk with Todd about coaching or consulting, email him at info@cornerstoneglobaltps.com.

Project Management Skills Should be Required for Everyone!

Project Management Lifecycle

An organization I work with recently switched to a new email server. The plan was that at the flick of a switch everything would migrate to the new server and in less than five minutes everyone would be up and running. A week later the mess is still being cleaned up.

Very few IT projects that I’ve participated in have been implemented without some unexpected glitch. In fact, I think the mantra of many in IT is “expect the unexpected.” The point being, as optimistic as one might be, it’s a good idea to think about what could go wrong and plan accordingly. And just as importantly, communicate accordingly.

In the scenario I described above, even if the switch would have worked and the system was up within minutes, there was additional set-up that every user needed to complete to activate the system. No one anticipated this. No email message with self-service instructions was provided, so the IT staff has had to work individually with everyone in the organization to get them set up.

Unfortunately, situations like this happen all the time.  We get focused on the core task and forget what is happening up and down stream. As a college professor I believe a critical skill that every college graduate must learn is basic project management. The project management body of knowledge (PMBOK) focuses on five key processes:

  1. Initiating
  2. Planning
  3. Executing
  4. Monitoring and Controlling
  5. Closing

There are also nine areas of knowledge that are central to managing any type of project:

PMBOK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Not everyone who leads a project will need to be concerned with every aspect of these nine areas of knowledge. However, a basic education in project management will promote the acquisition of a project management mindset that identifies areas of risk, possible derailments, and contingency plans. When employees are taught to anticipate what might happen, whether in customer interactions or technology implementations, communication can help control the process and curtail the need for inefficient crisis management if things go wrong.

The key to managing any project is asking the right questions before the project moves an inch. Here are a few that apply to almost all projects, and should be asked by everyone whether they are managing the project or not.

  1. What, exactly, is changing? What will be different when we’re done?
  2. What might go wrong? What will happen if things go awry? What makes for a good project implementation?
  3. What is my role? Do I need to communicate information down the line?
  4. Do I have critical information or concerns that I need to share with someone in charge?
  5. What assumptions am I making about the project?
  6. Are there others who may be affected by the project who don’t know as much as I do? What might I need to share with them?
  7. What could be done to make the project as smooth as possible?
  8. Would it help to create a FAQ document? A job aid or quick reference guide? What would help me do my job easier – that’s usually important to everyone.
  9. What has been communicated about the project? Is it sufficient? If someone walked in off the street could they make sense of what was happening?
  10. What are my co-workers most likely to ask questions (or grumble) about?

Failure to effectively manage projects results in inefficiency, including re-work or additional work, and causes hours of grumbling among staff. A little pre-planning and an extra communication effort can make a huge difference in the execution of a project. Going back to my original example, if the questions above were given any consideration, a whole week of stress, confusion, and reduced productivity could have been avoided.

The One-Page Project Manager: Communicate and Manage Any Project With a Single Sheet of Paper

Order The One-Page Project Manager from Minding the Gap Bookstore!

Absolute Beginner's Guide to Project Management (2nd Edition)
Order The Absolute Beginner’s Guide to Project Management from Minding the Gap Bookstore!

Illuminate and Eliminate Invisible Performance Barriers

Leaders spend a great deal of time creating strategies, laying out short– and long-term  plans to increase market share, improve net income, or simply retain customers only to have those best-laid plans run into unseen barriers. The types of barriers range from unforeseen expenses to a lack of motivation from employees.

To uncover these hindrances to performance and deal with them effectively takes an ability to analyze factors within the organizational system. This is no easy task in the rapid-fire corporate environment most of us live in.  The barriers remain hidden to us because we can’t slow down enough to reflect and consider what is getting in the way of the plans we were sure would work.

Exposing performance gaps requires a systematic approach that looks beyond the surface assumptions, such as training, pay and incentives. It is a common solution to retrain or reprimand employees who are not meeting performance expectations, but we fail to get to the real issue, which could be anything from an ineffective software program, a poor system of accountability, or a workflow that creates a bottleneck outside the control of the employee you’ve determined is a poor performer.

The fact is, identifying gaps in human performance is not simple. It takes skill and a reliable process to evaluate the multiple factors that contribute to performance gaps.  A useful model is the Human Performance Technology model promoted by the International Society for Performance Improvement, which espouses ten competencies that, properly applied, identify the unseen barriers and provide a framework for performance improvement.

 Illuminating and eliminating invisible performance barriers takes practice, but the benefits of following the HPI model leads to net gains, increased engagement/satisfaction, and an increasing ability to see the unseen as the organization builds a culture of evaluating the system and making smart, strategic decisions.

*To find out more about Human Performance Improvement & Technology, visit www.ispi.org

Visit www.cornerstoneglobaltps.com for more information about HPT-based consulting.

Employees key to bouncing back after the recession

Few companies have come through the past 2-3 years unscathed by the recession. Leaders should consider the impact the recession has had on those who have survived in your organization. How are your employees doing at riding the wave of the economic crisis?

  • Are they disheartened, barely hanging on?
  • Are they committed to your organization and doing everything they can to maximize revenue?
  • Are they coming to you with innovative solutions to bring new customers?
  • Are they maintaining your reputation or just waiting for an opportunity to jump ship?
  • Have you been so focused on surviving the recession to pay much attention to the needs of your employees?

Most companies cut training and development when times get hard.  At the same time incentives and motivational processes take a hit, leading to a discouraging scenario for employees.  If layoffs or deferred hiring also are used to cut expenses during a downturn, the surviving employees are asked to do more with less. The accumulative effect is a disengaged workforce that puts in minimal effort, feeling that the organization doesn’t do anything to earn their commitment.

Not all of this is fair, of course, since employers have to do something to ride out the storm. It’s important for business leaders to understand the value of learning during challenging economic times. The old adage, “You have to spend money to make money” comes into play here.  According to a 2009 study by The American Society for Training and Development (ASTD) and i4cp (Organizational Learning in Tough Economic Times), 38% of companies plan to place more emphasis on learning during the economic crisis. The remaining 60% are either maintaining pre-recession levels or cutting back, some drastically.

The reality is that there’s never been a better time to focus on talent development within your organization.  It is your employees that will pull your company through and help your regain traction as the economy begins to recover.  Managers and business owners must become astute at managing performance, growing talent, and leveraging strengths to maximize human capital.

Because people are the cornerstone to any business – the foundation upon which the organization either stands strong or falters, the wisest thing for companies to do is become experts in managing human performance.  A strong human capital strategy includes an assessment of desired verses actual performance, analysis of strengths & competencies and selection practices to ensure the right people are in the right job, and a commitment to developing people that doesn’t waver despite market and economic fluctuations.

The good news is that human performance management doesn’t have to be expensive! And the return on investment pays off quickly. The key is having a plan and sticking with it. Once processes are in place they can be maintained through feast or famine.  Keep in mind the toll that the economic crisis has on your employees and consider budget-conscious solutions that will keep them engaged. Your employees want to succeed, but need to know they can trust management to support them.

As businesses make difficult decisions about how to pull through the current economic downturn, they must think beyond the knee-jerk reaction to slash costs to the bone. In ASTD’s Economic Survival Guide, the message is “Survival of the learning function in a down economy is all about leveraging existing best practices, eliminating redundancies, and creating programs or situations where employees can learn from each other.” You may want to invest in the services of an organization development consultant to initiate your human performance analysis, which will ensure you’re focusing on the most valuable efforts that lead to sustainable performance and position your company for success as the economy bounces back.

The Art of the Start as a Free Agent

Daniel Pink speaking at the Chartered Institut...

Image via Wikipedia

Fellow blogger, Tony Wanless (ReinventionstBlog), gave some good advice about starting your own business. He suggests independents should 1) Commit 2) Learn how to run a business 3) Get a speciality and 4) Picture it. This aligns with what I’ve heard from the dozen or so friends in my network who have generously shared their secrets of going solo, which I’m planning to turn into a book. The gurus I’ve met with have encouraged me to…

  1. Plan on a longer sales cycle – it always takes longer than you think to win business.
  2. Leverage social media and contribute to online publications.
  3. Hone your sales skills and know how to market what you do.

Daniel Pink‘s Free Agent Nation has been recommended by several friends, so I got a copy and am enjoying it immensely. I always like Pink’s writing – he has a great ability to present data in an interesting way. You can pick up a copy through my Amazon store.